MC's Whispers

Whispering Silences

Archive for the tag “thoughts on life”

Be your own captain

©MCD

In a sea of torments, become your own captain.

Learn to navigate through the storms, to overcome the waves of anguish your mind creates;

To surpass the monsters that rage inside of you.

Learn to maintain your calm and rationale in the depths of the ocean, in the heart of the tempests and in the midst of the darkest nights.

Trust your intuition; know that sometimes your instinct knows best and will lead you to shore.

The downpour won’t last forever.

Prepare your mind and soul for it.

Also part of Weekend Writing Prompt #158

Wrongfully accused

https://www.pinterest.co.uk/pin/689613761668636443/

The first thing that flashed into his mind at the sound of the verdict was the image of his primary school playground. Four kids had set up a court there and were playing judge and criminals. He was one of the criminals, presumably a robber. The judge – a pig-tailed blondie whom he had a crush on – deemed him guilty. When he asked why she replied “because I rule” and added slyly “because Sissy gave you her cookie and you took it”. He couldn’t remember who Sissy even was. But it was a silly reason as that that got him convicted then.

It was an unjustified reason that got him convicted now too. He was at the wrong place at the wrong time.

Wrongfully accused.

Just because they could make him appear guilty. And he was there.

Justice isn’t always moral. And it isn’t always served to those who deserve it.

Compromise in the right timing

Compromise entails a powerful connotation. Because those who can appreciate its meaning can comprehend that it is better to bend a little than to break.

In order to meet in the middle, both sides need to make an effort, and stretch a  bit to reach out to each other.

Sometimes it is not enough to be right. Sometimes being right does not change a situation or bring a desired outcome.

In the same way, sometimes it is not enough to want something tremendously. Or to have great chemistry.

Sometimes it is also about timing. And timing doesn’t always agree with us.

Things will happen if you insist on them. If you work towards a purpose. If you try hard enough. And if you persist in what you want.

It’ll all fall into place when the time is right.

Just be patient.

Missing something you don’t know

©Jan Wayne Fields

How can you miss something you never had; you’ve never even tried?

How can the longing for it be so great that you yearn for it constantly?

How can you dream of a paradise you’ve never seen in reality?

She scribbled in her notebook all during the entire flight. She’d lost count of the hours it took her to get there.

All she cared about was that she was finally going. There. To that place she had been dreaming of ever since her eyes fell on an advertorial in a travel magazine. Somewhere by chance.

But here – finally – by choice.

Also part of Friday Fictioneers

De-cluttering memories

©Rochelle Wisoff-Fields

He arrived to find tens of cardboard boxes stacked outside the back door ready for use.

He stepped inside cautiously like a cat tiptoeing around obstacles.

Hello? Anyone here?

I’m in here!” His mum’s voice was faintly heard from the attic.

She was sitting around a series of memories, handkerchief in hand.

I saw a fridge dumped on the way home yesterday; so I decided to de-clutter the house”, she explained.

He looked around. There was a lifetime of objects, which to him didn’t mean much.

In our time, when something broke, we fixed it instead of throwing it away”.                           

Also part of Friday Fictioneers

The quiet ones

It’s the quiet ones you should fear. Because they have a whirlwind of thoughts howling in their minds.

They won’t always tell you what they’re thinking, but you can see their emotions reflected in their eyes.

They are the ones who will look out for you no matter what. They’ll be there whenever you ask for help, and will go out of their way to please you. They’re the ones you want to have as friends because you take for granted that they’ll do their utmost for you. But they’re also the ones you fail to appreciate. Yet, they stay. Because that is the type of person they are. They don’t measure or count what they do for you, they do things because they feel them in their heart.

The quiet ones are the ones who also need others the most, regardless how much they say otherwise.

They would ideally like to have people around who care as much as they do. People who during a crisis will show up without having been asked to simply to check in on them. We all want friends around us who every once in a while ask if we’re OK, if we need anything, or simply to be there for a walk, a chat, and a hug. People who are present and make it all seem manageable because we don’t feel like we’re fighting against the world alone.

It’s the quiet rivers that lead to the loudest streams. But when they’re calm, they offer the most refreshing waters.

Close attachment

It is said that the problem with the modern world is that we become too attached to things and give them more importance than we do to people. Or perhaps the problem is that we become too attached in general.

The truth is, we become attached to things and people in which and whom we seek to find ourselves. It is the memories we become attached to, the things we reminisce when looking at a thing, or when being with a person. It’s that feeling that revives inside of us when we are around them.

My laptop crashed suddenly yesterday evening. It only took a second to happen, but it changed everything. My laptop is both my work and my pleasure. So you can imagine there is a lifetime building on it every single day. It’s as if having a best friend in the form of an object. And it just…crashed, leaving a feeling of having ripped out a part of me.

It’s not the object itself we become so tightly bound to. It is everything it represents for us, all the things it got us through when there was no one else around, all the aspects of our character that we forged around it and through it, the hopes and dreams we invested in it, and all the moments it represents for us.

So in essence, it is not the things we are really attached to. It is that part of ourselves that we found through them.

Sentiments of a photo

©C.E.Ayr

There are photos that capture inside of them a bit of your soul. You look at them and can remember every single sentiment you felt in that very moment the photo was taken. You can sense the aura of the person you’re with. The feeling in the air around you. The emotions that ran inside of you.

There are photos like this that you want to keep forever. Or as long as that lasts.

But there are precisely those photos that hurt the most when that sentiment expires.

When you no longer feel that joy, you want all evidence removed.

Also part of Friday Fictioneers

Independent confinement

https://imagevars.gulfnews.com/2020/04/03/2020-03-29T140720Z_1382524387_RC2PTF9A1I4D_RTRMADP_3_HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS-FRANCE-LOCKDOWN--Read-Only-_1713fa2cee6_medium.jpg

Tom was frequently likened to a cat. Mainly because, whenever he could, he slept for most of the day.

He didn’t mind being compared to a clever feline. He rather saw it as a compliment.

Cats are perhaps the most independent pets around. They can take care of themselves and act as if you’re living in their house rather than the other way around. They are the beings for whom the problem during lockdown is that everyone else is staying home with them. But they can also teach you so many things on how to manage self-confinement. They know how to adopt a slower pace of life as the norm; to seek out the sunny spots in the house; take stretch breaks; stay curious and always discover new things making each day exciting; contact a human every so often; keep a tidy space and clean yourself often.

Cats are the embodiment that life is easier when you’re not too busy with what others are doing.

The problem with people like Tom is that they can’t be like cats for too long. Everything in life requires a measure, a balance to be complete. And even though it is healthy to spend time alone; to know how to be alone and not be defined by another person, happiness has greater value when it is shared.

And in order to be able to live fully, we need more people (or animals) in our life. People who share our concerns, and who will seek us out whenever we choose to disappear in the most incredible hideaways.

We will meet again soon. For the time being, choose to shine; it’ll soon become a habit.

The value of a lockdown

©MCD

So we’ve spent perhaps one of the strangest Easters of our time. But we managed to celebrate it as much as possible, with people who are far yet near with the aid of technology, with love and wishes that know no borders, and with optimism and positive vibes that everything will pass and we will meet again soon.

The truth is that if you’re not in hospital, if you’re not sick, if you’re “stuck” at home with your family, if you even have a home, if you’re not entirely alone in a house away from your loved ones, this Easter in quarantine was not your worst Easter. In fact, it may even be your most memorable one. Because it taught you lessons you so far failed to see.

How to spend time with the people you share your home and life with; who matters and who cares enough to be around even if they can’t see you in person; the importance of exchanging wishes and words of encouragement even if no physical interaction may be involved. But most importantly, it revealed the reinvigoration of going outside for fresh air, for a walk in the park, or around your neighbourhood – parts of which you just recently discovered. How to spend time slowly, relishing every moment of it, to pause, to breathe, to enjoy things that we missed or didn’t have time for.

The lockdown is actually forcing us to slow down our pace of life and in the process to actually live our life.

And as we relax, inhaling the cleaner air around, we wonder why we haven’t lived like this for so long. Why this wasn’t the normal we are all longing to return to.

There will come a time when we will reminisce the weeks we were forced to stay home, learning to value the time we have and appreciating the small things that we miss, despite our constant moaning about our confinement.

Wouldn’t it be great if we would have learnt something out of all this and changed some of our habits?

“In the rush to return back to normal, use this time to consider which parts of normal are worth rushing back to” – Dave Hollis

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